Archive for January, 2016

How to Make a Medieval Bag for a Medieval Princess

by

S.Roberts

Dressing up as a medieval princess is all well and good, but unlike medieval ladies of the time whose bags would have only contains a few coins, a the pious would also carry their paternoster (prayer beads that later became known as a rosary), nether of which would take up as much room as modern day essentials, items such as your mobile phone, lipstick, car keys, purse and digital camera for those Kodak moments.

It s not easy to find a medieval style handbag on the high street that would accompany a medieval princess style dress, but you can make a little decorative medieval looking pouch quite easily.

This little medieval bag pattern makes up a small drawstring shoulder bag which is fully lined. If you have made the medieval dress yourself, the bag can be made in left over fabric to match the dress.

To Make a Medieval Bag or Pouch you will need…

A sheet of A4 paper to make a pattern,

2 pieces of contrasting fabric,

Some lining material,

Some lace or ribbon for embellishment,

A length of cord and a tassel of the same colour,

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A chunky bead and a smaller bead,

A length of wide elastic in a similar colour to the lining material if possible,

And some strong glue.

To make the Pattern

Fold the A4 paper in half long ways to make a long thin piece. Then fold the paper in half the other way to reduce the length of the tall strip, and then unfold this second fold. This crease is a marker.

From one end at the fold, begin to cut a triangle from the point going out to the where the crease and the side edge of the paper meet. You are aiming to cut out a shield type shape.

This is your medieval bag pattern.

Cutting the Fabric

You will need to cut 2 bag shapes from the lining material and the main colour material.

If you are using a fabric with a nap, make sure that the nap strokes down the bag to the tip.

Once you have cut out the full pieces, cut along the marker crease on the pattern and discard the square shape. Cut our two pieces of the triangle shape, from the contrasting fabric. Turn the straight raw edge of the fabric over and press.

Sewing the Bag

Sew the two lining pieces around the long edges and the point.

Set out the two main bag parts and lay on top the contrasting fabric. Where the two fabrics join, lay on a length of ribbon or lace. Pin everything into place before sewing.

With the two embellished bag parts, right sides together sew together as you did for the lining. Turn right sides out.

Carefully turn down a small hem (1 cm) around the opening of the bag and pin in place.

Push the lining into the bag, and again fold down a small hem and pin it to the main bag hem just below the top edge. Sew the lining to the main bag.

Gathering the Top

The neck of the bag is gathered with wide elastic about 2 inches from the top edge. Firmly attach the end of the elastic to the inside of the bag on a seam.Then set the sewing machine to large zigzag stitch to sew along the elastic. Pull the elastic tightly as you sew, this gathers up the fabric of the bag. Sew all around and then finish off neatly.

This opening can be left as it is or you can add some Velcro if you want to seal the bag more securely.

Cord Embellishment and Tassel

Starting on the lowest most point of the bag, pin the cord that is to be used for the handle along the side seam of the bag. Follow the seam all the way up to the gathered top, and then leave a length of cord for the handle (enough to allow the bag to sit on the hip when worn over the shoulder is ideal) Then follow the seam down from the gathered part back down to the point on the bottom of the bag. Use some tape to seal the ends of the cord to prevent it from unravelling. Sew the cord into place.

To Attach the Tassel

Cover your taped cord ends in glue and push on a chunky bead that secures the cord ends inside it. Then slip a bead onto the tassel, and poke the tassels loop up into the glued part of the first bead. A cocktail stick is a handy tool for this task. Leave the bag to one side for the glue to dry.

A Notice for Medieval Men

It was considered a token of affection to present one’s lady love with a bag, so you had better print off this pattern and make that special medieval lady in your life a medieval drawstring bag.

http://busy-crafting.blogspot.com Do you enjoy arts and crafts? Do you friends and family often find you busy crafting? Well this is possibly the blog for you, crammed full of arts and craft ideas for the garden, home and family.

Article Source:

ArticleRich.com

22
Jan

British company designs Paris Hilton protest panties

   Posted by:    in Uncategorized

Sunday, June 3, 2007 

With photographers and media gathering for an appearance by Paris Hilton, who is sentenced to serve jail time, the fashion industry has joined the ‘free or jail Paris Hilton debate.’

British company Mio Destino designed a line of prison-striped lingerie embroidered with the words ‘Free Paris’ in support of Hilton. A ‘Jail Paris’ embroidery was later added to the lingerie following intense demand.

The 45 day jail sentence is scheduled to begin on Tuesday at the Century Regional Detention Center in suburban Lynwood, Los Angeles County after Hilton was convicted of driving recklessly for traveling at a speed of 70 miles per hour in a 35 miles per hour zone with no headlights after dark in February this year. The offense occurred while her driver’s license was suspended after a driving under the influence conviction last November.

Hilton added her signature to an online petition, Free Paris Hilton, hosted by iPetitions, that appealed to California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger for a pardon. The petition states that Hilton “didn’t hurt or kill anyone, and she has learned her lesson. She is sincere, apologetic, and full of regret for her actions as she explained tearfully to the Judge handling her case in court yesterday. She is distraught and understandably afraid.” The petition has garnered over 30,000 signatures.

A counter petition, again hosted by iPetitions, calling for Hilton’s imprisonment received 87,715 signatures as of Sunday.

With good behavior while serving time, Hilton may be able to get out of jail in 23 days.

21
Jan

British company designs Paris Hilton protest panties

   Posted by:    in Uncategorized

Sunday, June 3, 2007 

With photographers and media gathering for an appearance by Paris Hilton, who is sentenced to serve jail time, the fashion industry has joined the ‘free or jail Paris Hilton debate.’

British company Mio Destino designed a line of prison-striped lingerie embroidered with the words ‘Free Paris’ in support of Hilton. A ‘Jail Paris’ embroidery was later added to the lingerie following intense demand.

The 45 day jail sentence is scheduled to begin on Tuesday at the Century Regional Detention Center in suburban Lynwood, Los Angeles County after Hilton was convicted of driving recklessly for traveling at a speed of 70 miles per hour in a 35 miles per hour zone with no headlights after dark in February this year. The offense occurred while her driver’s license was suspended after a driving under the influence conviction last November.

Hilton added her signature to an online petition, Free Paris Hilton, hosted by iPetitions, that appealed to California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger for a pardon. The petition states that Hilton “didn’t hurt or kill anyone, and she has learned her lesson. She is sincere, apologetic, and full of regret for her actions as she explained tearfully to the Judge handling her case in court yesterday. She is distraught and understandably afraid.” The petition has garnered over 30,000 signatures.

A counter petition, again hosted by iPetitions, calling for Hilton’s imprisonment received 87,715 signatures as of Sunday.

With good behavior while serving time, Hilton may be able to get out of jail in 23 days.

20
Jan

British company designs Paris Hilton protest panties

   Posted by:    in Uncategorized

Sunday, June 3, 2007 

With photographers and media gathering for an appearance by Paris Hilton, who is sentenced to serve jail time, the fashion industry has joined the ‘free or jail Paris Hilton debate.’

British company Mio Destino designed a line of prison-striped lingerie embroidered with the words ‘Free Paris’ in support of Hilton. A ‘Jail Paris’ embroidery was later added to the lingerie following intense demand.

The 45 day jail sentence is scheduled to begin on Tuesday at the Century Regional Detention Center in suburban Lynwood, Los Angeles County after Hilton was convicted of driving recklessly for traveling at a speed of 70 miles per hour in a 35 miles per hour zone with no headlights after dark in February this year. The offense occurred while her driver’s license was suspended after a driving under the influence conviction last November.

Hilton added her signature to an online petition, Free Paris Hilton, hosted by iPetitions, that appealed to California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger for a pardon. The petition states that Hilton “didn’t hurt or kill anyone, and she has learned her lesson. She is sincere, apologetic, and full of regret for her actions as she explained tearfully to the Judge handling her case in court yesterday. She is distraught and understandably afraid.” The petition has garnered over 30,000 signatures.

A counter petition, again hosted by iPetitions, calling for Hilton’s imprisonment received 87,715 signatures as of Sunday.

With good behavior while serving time, Hilton may be able to get out of jail in 23 days.

By Cory Bowman

Annuities offer two key advantages when it comes to estate planning: speed and privacy. An annuity specialist can designate one or more beneficiaries for the client’s annuity rather than have the annuity made payable to the client’s estate. A client’s ‘estate’ is the sum of his or her assets, including legal rights and entitlements to property of any kind, not including any current liabilities. Clients may find it beneficial to estimate the dollar value of his or her estate, which can help not only with general planning, but also to predict whether or not the estate will be liable for estate taxes. The value of the estate will most likely be worth a different amount when the client passes away, so determining precise figures is not necessary. At a certified annuity school, financial specialists will learn the specifics of the estate planning process.

The most important decisions that an annuity specialist will help make pertain to which involved party gets what and when they will get them. Although clients may have an idea of who should inherit each of their properties, a number of issues exist that the client should consider, including naming alternate beneficiaries and staggered inheritances. Naming beneficiaries often proves to be less complicated than making an annuity payable to the estate, which will have to pass through the client’s will. Every client should have a will, as it is essential to estate planning. The executor named in the will has legal authority to administer the transfer of property covered in the will. Although having a will is highly suggested, there is one main drawback: property left by a will must go through probate.

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The annuity specialist and his or her client should not decide what property to transfer by will until he or she has looked at transfer methods that avoid probate. No matter what decisions are made to avoid probate, a will is still needed. At a minimum, a will is a backup device essential to the transfer of any property that somehow was not transferred by other methods, such as property that was overlooked or unexpectedly acquired. In almost all US states, a will is the only document used to name a personal guardian for minors. For some types of property, such as a personal checking account or a vehicle, a will may be the best way to make transfers. If one or more beneficiary lacks the financial sophistication to preserve and manage a large windfall, many annuity specialists will ensure that the client specifies whether one, some, or all of the beneficiaries must receive their share of the annuity proceeds in the form of a series of periodic payments over a specified period of time.

Annuities are subject to income taxes at the time of the client’s death, and, if client assets are considerable, they may be subject to estate taxes as well. Aspiring annuity specialists will learn in annuity school that if clients want to maximize what their clients’ beneficiaries will receive, they should consider using some of their annuity money to purchase life insurance. Estate planning and will preparation are important for both the specialist and his or her client. Annuities play a large role in estate planning as well as will preparation, and certified specialists are needed to ensure the process runs smoothly for everyone involved.

About the Author: Cory Bowman is Director of Ops at the Institute of Business Finance. IBF has helped thousands of members of the financial services industry attain designations. For more information about

annuity school

,

annuity specialist

, visit http://www.icfs.com

Source:

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18
Jan

U.S. Supreme Court overturns Arthur Andersen conviction

   Posted by:    in Uncategorized

Wednesday, June 1, 2005 

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday overturned a witness tampering conviction against accounting firm Arthur Andersen LLP for destroying documents related to now-bankrupt energy giant Enron Corp. The verdict virtually put Andersen, once one of the largest accounting firms in the world and the fifth-largest in the United States, out of business.

In a unanimous opinion written by Chief Justice William Rehnquist, the court threw out the verdict due to serious flaws in the jury instructions. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals had upheld Andersen’s June 15, 2002 conviction in Houston.

In the court’s view, the instructions allowed the jury to convict Andersen without proving that the firm knew it broke the law or that there was a link to any official proceeding that prohibited the destruction of documents. “The jury instructions at issue simply failed to convey the requisite consciousness of wrongdoing,” Rehnquist wrote. “Indeed, it is striking how little culpability the instructions required.” Rehnquist’s opinion also expressed grave skepticism at the government’s definition of “corrupt persuasion”–persuasion with an improper purpose even without knowing an act is unlawful. “Only persons conscious of wrongdoing can be said to ‘knowingly corruptly persuade,’ ” he wrote.

The ruling came very quickly, as oral arguments in the case had taken place on April 27. Justice Department attorneys claimed Andersen employees were instructed “undertake an unprecedented campaign of document destruction” in order to impede a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation into Enron’s conduct. Deputy Solicitor General David Dreeben likened Andersen’s behavior to “shredding its smoking guns.”

However, Maureen Mahoney, arguing for Andersen, countered that the employees involved merely followed the company’s policy on destroying unneeded documents, and that the shredding occurred before Andersen received a subpoena on November 8, 2001. She also claimed that under the government’s legal definition of “corrupt persuasion,” acquittal was virtually impossible.

The justices seemed to indicate which way they were leaning very early in oral arguments, as they peppered the government lawyers with hostile remarks.

Justice Antonin Scalia called the government’s theory of prosecution “weird.” Justice Sandra Day O’Connor was particularly troubled by the trouble the jury initially had sifting the evidence. “If this thing is so confusing,” she asked, “how is a businessperson supposed to know? How is a lawyer supposed to know?”

Andersen’s appeal was backed by the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. In a friend-of-the-court brief, the association claimed that the government’s broad definition of “corrupt persuasion” put defense lawyers at risk for prosecution simply for advising clients of their rights to assert legal privileges or review document retention policies.

Despite the ruling, which returns the case to the Fifth Circuit, it is highly unlikely Andersen will ever return as a viable business. It lost nearly all of its clients after its indictment, and was forced to shut down its American accounting practice due to federal laws that forbid convicted felons from auditing public companies. The firm still faces more than 100 civil suits related to its audits of Enron and other companies. Once 28,000 employees strong, the Chicago-based Andersen is now down to around 200 employees who are largely occupied with handling the civil suits and other details of winding down the partnership.

17
Jan

U.S. Supreme Court overturns Arthur Andersen conviction

   Posted by:    in Uncategorized

Wednesday, June 1, 2005 

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday overturned a witness tampering conviction against accounting firm Arthur Andersen LLP for destroying documents related to now-bankrupt energy giant Enron Corp. The verdict virtually put Andersen, once one of the largest accounting firms in the world and the fifth-largest in the United States, out of business.

In a unanimous opinion written by Chief Justice William Rehnquist, the court threw out the verdict due to serious flaws in the jury instructions. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals had upheld Andersen’s June 15, 2002 conviction in Houston.

In the court’s view, the instructions allowed the jury to convict Andersen without proving that the firm knew it broke the law or that there was a link to any official proceeding that prohibited the destruction of documents. “The jury instructions at issue simply failed to convey the requisite consciousness of wrongdoing,” Rehnquist wrote. “Indeed, it is striking how little culpability the instructions required.” Rehnquist’s opinion also expressed grave skepticism at the government’s definition of “corrupt persuasion”–persuasion with an improper purpose even without knowing an act is unlawful. “Only persons conscious of wrongdoing can be said to ‘knowingly corruptly persuade,’ ” he wrote.

The ruling came very quickly, as oral arguments in the case had taken place on April 27. Justice Department attorneys claimed Andersen employees were instructed “undertake an unprecedented campaign of document destruction” in order to impede a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation into Enron’s conduct. Deputy Solicitor General David Dreeben likened Andersen’s behavior to “shredding its smoking guns.”

However, Maureen Mahoney, arguing for Andersen, countered that the employees involved merely followed the company’s policy on destroying unneeded documents, and that the shredding occurred before Andersen received a subpoena on November 8, 2001. She also claimed that under the government’s legal definition of “corrupt persuasion,” acquittal was virtually impossible.

The justices seemed to indicate which way they were leaning very early in oral arguments, as they peppered the government lawyers with hostile remarks.

Justice Antonin Scalia called the government’s theory of prosecution “weird.” Justice Sandra Day O’Connor was particularly troubled by the trouble the jury initially had sifting the evidence. “If this thing is so confusing,” she asked, “how is a businessperson supposed to know? How is a lawyer supposed to know?”

Andersen’s appeal was backed by the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. In a friend-of-the-court brief, the association claimed that the government’s broad definition of “corrupt persuasion” put defense lawyers at risk for prosecution simply for advising clients of their rights to assert legal privileges or review document retention policies.

Despite the ruling, which returns the case to the Fifth Circuit, it is highly unlikely Andersen will ever return as a viable business. It lost nearly all of its clients after its indictment, and was forced to shut down its American accounting practice due to federal laws that forbid convicted felons from auditing public companies. The firm still faces more than 100 civil suits related to its audits of Enron and other companies. Once 28,000 employees strong, the Chicago-based Andersen is now down to around 200 employees who are largely occupied with handling the civil suits and other details of winding down the partnership.

17
Jan

California judge disqualified from predatory lending case

   Posted by:    in Uncategorized

Thursday, December 27, 2012 

Judge James A. Stoelker of Santa Clara County, California Superior Court was disqualified from hearing a case on predatory lending practices the day before Christmas, on a technicality. The case was filed by David and Salma Merritt of Santa Clara County against multiple defendants, including Countrywide, Bank of America, and First American Title, among others.

The Merritts had challenged Judge Stoelker’s involvement in the case, claiming many of his rulings had favored his former clients even when law would have indicated otherwise. Some of the defendants are Judge Stoelker’s former clients.

The events leading to this case began in 2006 when the Merritts accepted a home loan from Countrywide. At that time, Countrywide was advertising 30-year mortgages at between 1 and 3 percent interest. The Merritts received a “good faith estimate” consistent with those advertisements. They claim that Countrywide representatives tricked them into signing loan documents that were subsequently altered to appear to commit them to an obligation they had not agreed to.

A review of similar predatory lending cases filed by individuals in California found that all had been settled in at most 9 months, usually in favor of the banks. Merritt v. Mozilo has continued in the courts for much longer, celebrating its third anniversary last Saturday. The Merritts’ claims are consistent with published statements by Eileen Foster, former Executive Vice President of Fraud Risk Management at Countrywide, that fraud was endemic to certain parts of Countrywide.

Theirs was the only case heard in Department 9 that morning in recognition of Christmas. That hearing was scheduled, because the Sixth District of the California Court of Appeals (case number H038883) required the Santa Clara County Superior Court to (a) give all parties an opportunity to be heard regarding the possible disqualification of Judge Stoelker and (b) reply to the appellate court by December 26. This appellate ruling was only issued on November 26, and Judge Mark H. Pierce did not schedule the required hearing until December 12. The notice for this hearing required parties to file responses ten days before, which meant that the parties only had two days to prepare their replies.

On August 16, the Merritts learned Judge Stoelker had represented defendants in this case on numerous occasions before he was appointed to the bench in December 2010 and had not disclosed this fact to the Merritts. The next day they filed a Verified Statement of Disqualification asking Stoekler to recuse himself. The California Code of Civil Procedure (CCP) 170.3(c)(3) and (4) [confirmed in the 1988 appellate decision in Lewis v. Superior Court] give a judge ten days to respond to to such a motion. Stoelker replied on the eleventh day.

“All Rise” was heard at 9:04 AM local time Monday morning, whereupon Judge Pierce entered the courtroom. Attending by phone were attorneys James Goldberg representing Bank of America and Brian Craft representing First American Title. David Merritt was present representing himself. Goldberg had filed a brief asserting that the Merritts’ Verified Statement of Disqualification was served upon Judge Stoelker on August 17 but was not filed, as witnessed by the fact that it was not listed on the docket. Judge Pierce reported that he had checked the files and found that this Statement had indeed been filed, and he didn’t know why it was not on the docket. Attorney Goldberg suggested that the fact that the Statement was not on the docket may have contributed to Judge Stoelker’s failure to respond within the ten day limit. Judge Pierce replied, “That’s a stretch.”

Attorney Craft asked about next steps, since all action in this case had been stayed by the appellate court pending resolution of this issue. Judge Pierce then replied that Judge Manoukian would be handling discovery in this case, replacing Judge Stoelker in that capacity. He further stated that a reply to the appellate court had been prepared concurring with the appellate court’s disqualification of Judge Stoelker and asked Mr. Merritt to retrieve that order from the clerk in the courtroom and file it as usual with the clerk’s office. He also noted that this action would lift the stay. Other actions in this case could now proceed with the next steps being scheduled January 22, 2013, or later.

This is the second appellate reversal of decisions by this superior court in this case. The first reversal came on December 19, 2011, when the appellate court reinstated Wells Fargo as a defendant.

12
Jan

Use Stickers To Brand Your Business

   Posted by:    in Shipping

By Daniel Millions

While the terms “label” and “sticker” are often used interchangeably, they are in reality two very similar but different products. Whereas a label is generally used only as a functional item to identify a product, stickers can perform this same function but have a much more versatile and widespread usage.

Stickers are basically one-sided artifacts that are printed on paper, cloth, metal, polymer plastics or foil and have an adhesive added to the back so it can be attached to an object. For the purpose of identifying a product in a glass or plastic container, the adhesive will be of the permanent variety and not intended to be removed. This process is much less expensive than printing on the actual container even if it is a printable material.

Removable adhesive can be used in the cases of items that need identifying but do not require the identifying sticker to be left on the object. This type of sticker adhesive has enough holding power to stay on the product or item but not so much that it will tear the sticker or leave adhesive residue behind when it is removed.

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With the many uses of stickers for product identification there have been various adhesives produced. Some are formulated to withstand temperatures in the freezing range. Peel able adhesives are for stickers that need to be used several times and can be re-attached. Post-It Note ™ adhesive was developed as an accident while researching new adhesives for stickers.

Despite the thousands of commercial and industrial uses for stickers, these ubiquitous attachable items have even more uses in the private sector. Return address stickers make colorful additions to the envelope of your letters and saves time by not having to write it out or go to the greater expense of pre-printing envelopes. Voicing your opinion in public is easy when you put a bumper sticker on your car. As a memento of your journeys, a sticker on your luggage of every city you have visited has become a cultural tradition.

Children of all ages have taken advantage of the cheap cost and colorful variety to place stickers on just about any flat surface the world presents. Whether brightening up your schoolbooks or adding a touch of life and personality to the work cubicle, stickers can quietly demonstrate your likes and dislikes. A quick glance at the stickers you have surrounded yourself with can give a glimpse of the real you and are often the ice-breaking touch that can start a dialog with a newfound friend.

Stickers do not even have to be flat. Plastic stickers can be produced that have a foam insert between the printed layer and the adhesive layer which is then heat-sealed to produce “puffy” labels that are soft and responsive to the touch. A waterproof clear coating can be put over the printing on a sticker and make it last even out of doors.

Stickers can be obtained in many forms. Whether produced on a flat sheet and die-cut so they can be removed from the substrate individually or obtained on a roll to fit in a sticker dispenser they are handy and convenient to use. Stickers have become so popular that you can obtain blank sticker sheets from any office supply and print your own stickers with your computer printer or on a copier machine.

About the Author: High quality

Stickers

including custom

Stickers, Decals and Labels

of all sorts.

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Wednesday, July 7, 2010 

In light of an oil spill that occurred off the coast of southeast Queensland in 2009, a captain of a cargo ship and four companies are set to appear in court.

In March of last year, the cargo ship Pacific Adventurer, with Filipino national Bernardino Gonzales Santos at the helm, encountered bad weather, which resulted in its fuel tank being damaged by loose cargo, leading to the spillage 270,000 litres of oil into the Pacific Ocean. The oil later washed up on Sunshine Coast beaches as well as Moreton and Bribie islands and was dubbed “one of Australia’s worse environmental disasters” by the media.

Santos and four companies behind Pacific Adventurer face individual counts of discharging oil into the ocean and can be fined a maximum of AU$1.75 million in the case of the companies, while Santos faces a $350,000 fine if found guilty.

Santos is also charged with not taking reasonable action following the incident.

Richard Kendall, an executive of one of the involved companies, Swire Shipping LTD, said today that “[w]e are deeply regretful. But we will vigorously defend the charges […] We stand by Captain Santos, who is a first-class captain”.

Like Swire Shipping, China Navigation Company LTD and Bluewing Shipping LTD, who are both joint owners of Pacific Adventurer, pleaded not guilty to all charges.

However, prosecutor Peter Davis stated that “[t]he prosecution’s case is that the cause of the cargo going overboard was due to faulty lashings […] By failing to maintain the lashings, the defendants acted recklessly,” an act that prosecutors say should see the companies and captain pay.